British iGaming revenues hit by re-opening of land-based retail betting shops

In the United Kingdom and the Gambling Commission regulator has announced that the amount of money spent by domestic online gamblers in July fell by 4% when compared with the previous month to slightly above £459.1 million ($593.7 million).

The body used an official Thursday press release to explain that the decline came in the wake of a government decision that saw land-based retail betting shops allowed to re-open from June 15 following a twelve-week coronavirus-induced shuttering. The regulator also detailed that the final gross gaming yield figure represented a year-on-year rise and was indicative of how the nation’s iGaming market is evolving ‘as the country continues to move out of full lockdown into the autumn months’.

Consequential curve:

The information from the Gambling Commission moreover revealed that accumulated July revenues from online sportsbetting dropped by 4% month-on-month to about £209.3 million ($270.4 million) after posting a comparative 115% rise for June while associated slot takings decreased by 2% to approximately £162.8 million ($210.5 million).

Prominent pitfalls:

Furthermore, the Gambling Commission figures showed that the gross July figure for online poker had experienced a 23% month-on-month tumble to roughly £9 million ($11.6 million) following a significant rise at the height of the pandemic as virtual games posted a 17% deterioration to £7.9 million ($10.2 million). The data additionally exposed a comparative 25% plunge for aggregated eSports takings to approximately £2.6 million ($3.3 million) with other sources of online revenues including those from casino games dipping by 4% to circa £66 million ($85.4 million).

Relative recovery:

Although the periods may not be directly comparable, the Gambling Commission likewise pronounced that gross July gaming revenues for the United Kingdom’s collection of land-based betting shops thought to have grown by about 37% year-on-year to £62.4 million ($80.8 million) as takings from self-service betting terminals and other machines grew to top £23.2 million ($29.9 million) and £81.6 million ($105.5 million) respectively.